DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrabher, Gernot-
dc.contributor.authorThiel, Joachim-
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-13T13:14:03Z-
dc.date.available2022-06-13T13:14:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014-09-11-
dc.identifier.issn2076-0760en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repos.hcu-hamburg.de/handle/hcu/653-
dc.description.abstractThis paper starts from the assumption of a structural analogy between mega-events and large-scale disasters. Both imply forceful interruptions of everyday routines, and both involve imperatives for imminent action. Similar to the immovable deadline of an opening ceremony, a looming natural disaster triggers a complex set of precautions and preparations to cope with the inescapable forthcoming shock. In the case of mega-events, of course, this shock is self-induced. In fact, cities fiercely compete to host mega-events. In the face of the daunting challenges of hosting a mega-event—the immovable timeframe, the rigorous standards set by regulatory bodies, and the exceptional public visibility—the authorities and organizations in charge traditionally have resorted to strategies of a strict adaptation to the conditions imposed on them. Aligning all available resources and capabilities to match the foreseeable demands, however, undermines the adaptability to cope with unpredictable perturbations. This paper seeks to explore the strategies and practices to attain adaptability during the preparation, staging and implementation of legacy plans of a mega-event with an evidentially noteworthy record: the London Olympic Games 2012. The paper seeks to demonstrate that the project ecology in charge managed to enhance adaptability by implementing three key features of heterarchy: ambiguity, redundancy and loose coupling. By leveraging the principles of heterarchy, the project ecology was able to draw lessons from previous mega-events and both to anticipate and respond to unforeseen challenges.de
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectadaptabilityen
dc.subjectheterarchyde
dc.subjectproject organizationsde
dc.subjectOlympic Gamesde
dc.subjectLondonde
dc.subjecthigh reliabilityde
dc.subjectmega-eventsde
dc.subjecturban developmentde
dc.subject.ddc710: Landschaftsgestaltung, Raumplanungen_US
dc.titleCoping with a Self-Induced Shock: The Heterarchic Organization of the London Olympic Games 2012en
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.diniarticle-
dc.type.driverarticle-
dc.rights.cchttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/de/en_US
dc.type.casraiJournal Article-
dcterms.DCMITypeText-
tuhh.identifier.urnurn:nbn:de:gbv:1373-repos-8457-
tuhh.oai.showtrueen_US
tuhh.publisher.doi10.3390/socsci3030527-
tuhh.publication.instituteStadt- und Regionalökonomieen_US
tuhh.type.opus(wissenschaftlicher) Artikel-
tuhh.container.issue3en_US
tuhh.container.volume3en_US
tuhh.container.startpage527en_US
tuhh.container.endpage548en_US
openaire.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
datacite.relation.IsSupplementedByhttps://repos.hcu-hamburg.de/handle/hcu/652en_US
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.creatorOrcidGrabher, Gernot-
item.creatorOrcidThiel, Joachim-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.creatorGNDGrabher, Gernot-
item.creatorGNDThiel, Joachim-
crisitem.author.deptStadt- und Regionalökonomie-
crisitem.author.deptStadt- und Regionalökonomie-
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